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真人金花2020年05月27日17时35分48秒

时间:2020-05-27 17:35:49 作者:热门小说 浏览量:44224

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】二手车之家 QuJMg8EB\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tagsJ6GL

eRcnIt 】is one of the most popula/r destinations for /tourists and one of the most famous islands in the world but its 70,Text si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】aces0 inhabit\ants l】ive under the real threat of a pos/sible earthquake or a vol】canic eruption &md【ash; with【 no \evacuation plan【 set up.Ischia 】is on\【e of the pearls of the N\e【apolitan archipelag】o.\ Lar\ger th】【an Capri】 a/n\d Pr】ocida, 】its tourism has d【eveloped thanks to its morphological peculiarities and its volc\anic o/rigin【s. Even\ i】n winte\【r, the /elderly【 savour thermal treatments while younger and 】adventurous visitors take delight in climbing Mount Epome\o — Is【chia's peak that/ rises on /the【 slopes of 】an a【ctive s\ubmarin\e volcano whose last eruptio【【n da】\tes back to 1302.Walking aroun【d the si【x towns scattered a【roun【d the /islan/d, it \is impossible 【\not t/o no\tice// the sma\ll clouds of white smoke rising from t/he/ ground, emanating fro【m fumaroles o/r cracks in the earth th】at emi【【\ts off st】eam】 a\nd gas."Ischia is a volcanic island/, /the po】rt itself is o/n an ancient crater" explains Francesca Bianco】, director of the Nap】les Sectio【n of 【t】】he National Institute of Geophysics \and Volcano【logy's】 Vesuvius 【Observatory. The INGV【 moni【/tors vari\a】tio】ns in the param/eters \of control in the Neapolit】an volcanic distric\t, /an area that includes V/esuvius, Ischia and the Phlegraean 】Fields."At the m【oment \we are not 【recording an active volcanic dy【namic for \Ischia —\ I mea】n 【that the volcano is activ】e \but there are /no ano【malies. Instead,/ we are wit\ne\ssing a phase of lifting \an\d we\ have raised the alert l【evel【 for the Campi Flegrei," she\ added.'We live on fire'The underwater vol【can】o /is t】herefore 【no\t the imme\diate concern of researchers but I】sch【ia mu/st still face the threats of seismic mov】ements indirectly linked /【to its presence.I【n August 2017, the island was【 hit /b】y /【an /earthquake t【h【【at killed two people, injured more than 40 others, and destroyed man【y hous】es."We cannot】 predict earthquakes but \w】e know the seismi【c his】to/ry【 of the i\sland," Bianco continued. "The 2017 event i】s not\ linked to m【agm\/a【tic phenomena but we kno/w that, due】 to the presenc\e of the volcano, a】/nd its w/eigh\t, the isl】and is low\e/r【ing causing fr/act\ures. It is obviou/s that v】olcanic dynamics increase the seismic risk 】of【 Isc/】hia."The earthquake al/so highlighted just how difficult it can be to ma\na/ge an emerg\ency on the island. That ni\ght ab】out 20,000 people 【&mda/sh; l/ocals a【nd tourist【s &mdas\h; came to the\ port 【to be ev】a】cuat【ed but there we【re not enough ferries.Neverthe【less, th\e Ischitans do no【t seem to \worry t【oo m\uc\h a】【nd\ f】ace the/ risk 】with a t/ouch of typic\ally Ne【apol】ita\】n fatalism."We literally l/i/ve on f】ire, we p【ut ourselves in the hands of the Eternal Father, what/ 【else shoul【d we do?" an elderly gentleman, wh】o /sells cheeses and mozzarella on the roadside/, s/aid."You see,【 we 】are surrounded by the 【sea, 【where shoul】d we go? If there is an】】 eruption we die on t\he island or at sea, it\ is impo】ssib】le to 】leave he\re qui\ck/ly," a【nother inha【bitant said.'No integrated plan/'Fabio Matter\a, from the local Ci/vil \Pr\ote【ction, told Euro【news \that "there is no i\ntegrated plan【 on the is//land】 fo/r erup\t/ions and【 earthquak\es," despite【 the fact /that "th/e 2017 /】shoc/k ca【u\ght】 us comp\letely un【prep\are/d【.\""There is no in】/tegrated plan of the islan】d for】 eruptio】ns and earthquakes. 【The shock of 201】7 has caught us 】completely unprepared," explains 【Fabio Mat\ter【a of t】he local Civ】il Protection, while 】he\ sh【】ow\s me the small opera/ting r\oo【m 】o/bta【ined in an a/ncient therma/l centre used for ot【her functions/."Th/e Campania】 region has recently【 issued a tender for the municipalities to finance 】evacuation plans. Now 】every singl\/【e【 muni/】c【ipality should work out its /own plan,"\ he】 sa\】id, labelling it "nonsense""If t】he/re is 【a disaster i】t will involve the 【whole island and/ the/ strategy 【shou【ld be common," he concluded.Fran\cesco Emilio Borreli】, regional councillor for the/ Green party has 【been critica\l of the lack o】】f pre\paredness for years."】The 【three a\reas obs【erv】ed by【 the /INGV 】a】r\e【 very urbanised,"\ h】e flagged. "Vesuvius inv/olv【es】 700,000 people, there i】s\ an evacuation plan but the exercis】es】 are no】 longer carried【【 \out.】""In Pozzu/ol】】i (Campi Fle/gr/ei) they have created an ev】acuation plan and h\a/ve begun to 】do/ some test【s but we ar【e v】ery f【ar from the possib【ility of actuall\y saving 500,000 people. In/ Ischia/ there app】e/ars to be 】little interest from anyon【e,/ perhaps t/hey think\ tha\t\ it is impos/sible to save i/ts【】 inhabitants,/" /he went 】on.Men \vs naturePhe【nomena such as 【/ear/thquakes and volc/a【/nic eru/p】tions are often 【\unpredictable and dep\e】/nd on nature but some \of the serious consequenc\e】\s of the earth/quake \of 2017 can be attributed exclusiv\ely to human action.T【he volc/an【i\c areas/ of the Neapo【lit】an territory have face】d w/\ild urbanisatio】n over th/e years with administra/tio\ns that rarely managed to opp\ose buildi/ng sp\eculation.Vesuvius, Campi F/leg\r】ei and 】Ischi\a are home to over 1%】 of the Ital/ian\ popula【tion, exposed\ 】【to pos\sibl】e cat/astrophic ev\e/nts \without the p\ossibility of ra【pid eva】cuation.A well-known risk that did no/t prevent the pop】\ula】ti【on of Is/chia from 【growing ex/ponentially from 23,511 inhabita【nts in\ /1861 /t/o 34,201 in 196/1, and 64,031 in 2016.Over the /l】ast 】50 years】, urbanised areas on/ the】】 island ha】ve g/rown from 9% of the 【/whole/ territory \to 30%, a figure thr【ee times highe\r \than the nation【al average,\ accordi【ng t/o researc/h【ers from the U【niversity of L'Aqui\la.\/【 Ev【en \tourism【, after a brief decline following the e\arthquake, is g【rowin/【g ag【ain, with over 3 mill】ion ann\u/al visitor】s."There【 are\ d\oze\ns of magnit【ud\e 4 earthquakes i】n Italy. The one in Ischia o】f 2017 is the onl/y one /I ca\n \remember havi【ng caused s】im【ilar damages\ \",【 Bianco explained. "The damag【e of this pheno【menon, in th】is\ 【case/, is to be attributed 】more to \h/o/w men\【 have decided to/ build than 【to nature,"【 she con【cluded.'Single\ muni】cipality'For\ Bo/relli, the situation is】 【"rea/lly deadly"."We have a simila】r situation to】 Japan, we are talking about 【the are】a】 with the/ highest number of volcanoe/s in 】Italy and at the same time\ the mos】/t\ densely populated and highly 【urbanised, with th\e gr】eatest\ anthro【pic pressure and the highest /rate】 】of illegal activity," he stressed."The absen】ce of an evacu//a【tion pl\an for Ischia】 is explained by an irresponsibl/e policy. N【【ature is cyc\lic/\al, we\ know that we will f【ace other】 earthquakes, perhaps \an e/ruption, it may be/ in a ce\ntury, in a millennium. W\e should have a pol】i/cy that loo/ks to t\omorrow but it would be necessary 】】to pu【t admini【strations and citize】ns in f/ront of t/he fact that some areas must be co\mpletely evacuate【【d," he continued.【A fisherman told【 Euronew】s on the s\hore of t/he p】o\rt tha】t a/ single【 admin/is/tration should be c/reated to come u【p wi/th a single evac】】uatio/n 【plan /】for t】he whole island a/nd t\h】at the mayors o\f/ th【e six municipalities should, th】erefore, wo\rk together."I think that i\f they do\n't do it, n【ature will/ do what we can【't do: Epomeo will explod】e, ma/ke six lavas【 of fire and fi\nally】 make a single municipality," he said【.Share 】t\his articleS【hare\T/weet\Sha】re/send】Sha\re/Tweet\SharesendMoreHideShareSend/ShareSha【reShare/\SendS【har】eShareYou migh】【t also li】ke 】 \ 【 】 /Ita】lian【 brid/】ge【 colla】ps\es injuring only/ 】one\ as lockdown condit\ions red//uce traff】【ic 】 】 【 Ita/lian d【o/ctor treats/ corona】virus patients【】 at h【o/me 【 】 【 / / 【 【 】/ Baskets of【/ s\oli\da/r【ity lowered/ from Na\ples balconie\s amid】 coro/na\viru/s chaos 】 】】 \Mo【r【】【e aboutVolcano eruptionItalyEnvironmental prote\ctionEm/er//gency / 【Brow【se to】day s\ tagsDejs

rZue“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207\Wildlife photography:“I】\t's not just about beautiful pictures” 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsIb86PAWF

UF1aSaving the Sey】che\ll/es: plas\t\i【c 【washes up \on sho】res/ hardly t【ouched b】y \m\ankindogCX

DsIHMore than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ groupkLUN

PdfhText sizeAa\Aa【A vegan who&rsqu\o】;s passionate about】 zer/o-waste a】n/d/【 minimising the am/ount】 o/f harmful mate\】rials she consumes, such as /pla\stic and palm oil, Shia Su is a force for c【【\hange. Her In【stagram account, @_wastelandreb【e【l_ i/s a one-stop-shop for al】/l th【ings plan【t based, off】ering practical】 tips and useful /tri\cks fo【r making life more sustainable and eco-friend\ly. W【e caugh/t up with 【he\r \t【o find out more a】bout w\here \h【er \p】assion \comes from and w\【ha/t \she hopes t/o a【chieve【 with her inst【agram acc\o\unt.What inspired you \t】o sta】rt your Instagram a/cco【unt【?&/ldquo】;】I have been bloggin【g for eight years. /As a】 blogger, having social m/edia accounts/ lin【ked t【【o the 【bl【og was something \that just made 】se】nse.&rdqu【o;How has your relati【onship with sustainable food evolved ov】e【r 【time?&ldqu【o;I st】arted out as a food blo】gg】er in 2/011, d【eveloping and \sharing r\ecipes for cakes, cook】ie/s, /and desse】\rts. As y【ou can t//ell, \I&【rsquo;】\ve got the\ biggest sweet tooth! However,【 cook\ing has always been more of a necessary evil【 - so/mething an【noy/ing th【at had to be done.【 Unfortunately, even though he finds doing chores ca】l/m/in/g a【nd relaxing,】 my p\artner\ \still【 shares my lack o\f passion for ever【y/\d【ay food 】preparation. However, when we started to\ /reduce /o】ur trash we 【tur【ned to unprocessed】 food \as it is \ea/s/y to buy pack/age【-free. 】We】 were su/ddenly faced wi/th the see】mingly enormou】s task of learnin【g\ how to prepare food&】md】ash;from【 scr\atch!/ It 【was a cha/llenge at firs\/】t】, b/ut one that was wo\rth】 i/t. At the farmers’【 marke【t we】’d ask the farmers how to prepare vegetables【 /that 【we had never seen before. They also told us how\【 th/ey g\rew cert【ain thi】ngs. We have also bee\n able\ to go to farms to see all of it first hand【, so we now hav/e /a ve【ry【 di【fferent apprecia\tion for food.” Voir cette \pu\blication sur I/nstagramU/ne publication partag&eacut】e;e par Shia S【】【u, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd (@_was【tela/ndrebel_【) le 14 /Avril 2019 &a\grave; 9 :07 PDT Voir \cette publication 】sur \In【stagramUn】】】】e publication partagée par Shia Su, Ve\gan【 Zero Wast【e Nerd (\@_wastelandrebe/l_) 【】le 5 Mars 2019 à 11 】:20 PSTHave \y/ou always 【followed a s【ustainable diet?“Not at all! E【verything s\ugar】 was wha【t I was i\nto! And because none of us u【sed t】o enjoy co】oking, we lived /off proces/sed con/venience food a\nd tak\e out】. Thinki\ng bac【k now, I wonder 【how my body man/age】d to handle】 m\e \throwing all that junk \at it&helli【p;&rdqu/o;Ho】w can pe】ople ensur【e the food they bu【y/】 】is sustainably】 】made and sourced?“Download a ca【lendar th/at tells you what /is in sea】son w】here you live. Check it and b】uy at markets i\f you can.】 S\pea\king 【directly to the growers /means you can\ as】k 】th】em how long t】hey 】will 】【still 【be able t\o har/ve/st\ (and sell) this or that, and the【y can give you tips on how/ to f/ermen】t thi【ngs o\r /】ev】en share a quick recipe/】.”“/Some \st\a】ll\s w\ill o】nly/ be rese\lle【rs, b/ut some wil/l\ be th】e 】【farmers the/mselves. Ask t】hem w】here th【eir f】arm\ is and if you/ can /visit. \/Most farmers【 are more than h\appy to welcome】 y】ou - theyalways like it】 when\ people/ show【 genuine 【interest and appre\ciatio】n! Howeve/r, if a farmer /say//s no, \that’s a red fl】ag. What do they have to hide?\ If you see stickers on produc】e w【ith the\ name of another farm, or boxes with\ other name\s, it’s an indicator t\he pro\duce migh/t not be locall\y gro\wn. If【 you ask the farmer and th/e】y deny i\t,【 that’s another red flag. Kee\p in mind these ar】e exceptions.” \Voir cette\ publi【cation sur InstagramUne publication par/tag&\eacute;e【 par Shia Su, Vegan \Zero Waste Nerd (\@/_wast】elandrebe/l_) le 2 Mar/s 2019 à 5 :00 PST Voir cette public\ation sur Ins】ta\gramUne publication part/ag&ea/cut/e\;e 【pa】【r Shia Su, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd (\@_wastelandrebel_) le 21 F&eacu\te;【vr. 2019】 \/\à 6 :51\ PSTWha\t are the biggest problem areas in f】oo【d consumptio【n at the 】mome/nt when it\ come/s t【o sustainabil】ity?“Glob/【ally, abou】t a third of the food we gro\w is wasted. Fo\od has /bec】ome so aff【ordable in p/r【【【oport\ion\ to the income, compared to a f【ew d\e/cades ago. Easy】\ c【\ome, easy \g【o. We have/ also los】t sight of ho】w f】ood is grown and 】s】o m/uch effort goes into this whol\e process, because we can \just go【 to th】e next grocery store to get】 it. 【We also h【ave th【is mindset w\here we want a】ccess to anything anytime.【 We compl/etely disregard\ th\e fact that there are seasons, or that【 som\e】 【fr/uits simply【 do not gr【【ow locally. So our food supply /chai】n now spans across the globe, and our /fo【od travels【 farther than we\ /do【 ourselves. The longer the supply chain, howeve/r, the【 more is 】wasted,\ and the /mo\re packaging is needed to 【pro】tect the c\argo【.\ /T【his me】ans more plastic wa\st】e, too.&r【dquo;How【 w\ould/ you describ【e/ your photography aesthetic? What are y/ou hoping to inspire【?&ldquo\;To be honest, I/ think my photography i\s a bi】t all over the place at the moment. My life has/ been tur【ned ups【ide【 down last year,【】 and my photograp】hy reflects that. Regardless, what \is important to me \is to ad\d value to my followers life. Rig\ht now m【y photos might no\t 】reflect the calm, more minima【list and clean【 a】est\h】etic I’d like them/ 【to, but my posts are full of【 hands-on zero w/as【te tips and infor/mation.”What ti/ps\ can you offer people for r/educing thei】r food wa\s【te?“Buy less】 t】han 】what you fee\l you should buy. We hav【e the tendency 】to b\u【y too much, /encoura\g\ed 】b】y fr/idges【 that could house an\ ele【phant 】and pantries a【 family \c】ould sleep 】in//. If】 you’re the planner type—make a/ meal pl】an, shopping lists, and stick to them!】” Voir cett【e publication sur Instagram\Une pu/blication partag&ea【cute;e par】 S/hia Su, Vegan Zero Wa\s/t/e Nerd (\@【_wa【ste【la\ndrebel_) le 23 \Janv\.\ 2019 à 8 :45 PST Voir cette 】【p【ublication sur InstagramUne publication partag【ée par Shia/ Su, Vegan Zero Wa【ste【 Nerd (@/_was【】telandr】ebe\l_) le 1 Ma/i 20 à 12 :08 PDTWhen did you start working in sus\ta\inable eating and what was th【e 】c】/atalyst fo/r d】oing this?“All the amazing, in\spiring peopl【e I/ ha【ve/ met along the way 【were the ones tha】t kept me /going. Even th【ough I\ disliked cook【ing, talki【ng to\ \the farmers and following many amazin【g sustainable fo【od bloggers like Sara /from @shisodelicio/\u/s or C【】hristi】ne 】from @】co【/n】scious_c【/ooking made me want to try r【ecipes. They spiked my curios/ity for 【food and inspired 【me to venture into/ fermenting. Who wou】ld ha/【v/e thought I【&rsquo【;d】 go】】 f【rom fr【oz/】en【【 p/\izza girl to ferme【ntation-crazed lady?&\rdquo;Can you tell \me a little mor/e about【 your book?&\ldquo;I wro】te this book with t【】he v】oic/e of one my best friends since high school in mind. She is a career woma\n with 【a busy】 schedule a】n\d a/ long com】mute. She always said she’d【 love to have a more s/】us】tainable lif【estyle but /simply lacks the time to do 【the 【research a】nd to DIY \everything. Besides, she prefers to spend】 the little free t】\ime she has with her family and he】r husband】. And I get it—who&rs】quo;s got the time, re【【ally?” Voi/r ce/tte publication sur Instagra/mUne 【publication partagé【e par Shia S\u, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd\ (@_w【【a】stelandrebel_) le 6 Mars 2019 \&】agrave; 2 :45 PST“She wanted a preferably skim-\ab】le gui】de w】ith sim【ple hacks 】that she【 didn’t ha【v【e to/ read 】cove】r to cover. So I\ cam/e up with the /very visual【 beginner-friendly cookbook-lik【\e c/oncept. It【 h【elps you /get int】【o/ the ri【g/ht m】indset and provides background information, much like t\he i】ntroductory 】sec/\tion of\ c\ookbooks explaini】ng the particularities of a c【uisine. There is also a c/hapter on ze\ro waste /helpers s【o you kn【ow wha\t【 e/】quipment will \be h/elpful fo/r your ze【ro waste endeavo】urs. It&rsqu】o;s helpful【】 and very practica】l information, but if you do/n\&rsqu/o;t have t【he e【nergy to 【deal \with it, that’\s fin【e t/oo! Yo/u can ju\st jump to whatev/er 【you feel is man】ag【eable【 for 】you at the mome】nt, o/r whatever you/ feel drawn】 】to w\hen f/lipping thro【ugh】 the pages, a【nd try o【ne or two e\asy swaps or a one-mi【nut【e】【 recipe.&\rdquo;S【hia Su&rsq】uo;s Zero Wa】ste Book is 【out no【w and avai/lable here.Share this article\ More fro】m well/nessd0lL

Text sizeAaAaT/he Osc\ar-winning actor and\ fi【lm produ】c/e/r is no longer just the Wol/f\ of 【Wall 【Street, or our beloved Jack from Ti/tanic, he&\【rsqu/o;s now a ful\ly-fle【【dged env\i】ronm\e】ntalist on a mission.L【eading 【the c\harge on World E\arth\ Day every year, Di【Ca/prio this year released a '/We Lo\ve 【The Earth'/ music vid【eo aiming to【 make people【 think twice about the/ w】ay 】they treat the planet. He 】a【l/so made a 【do【c】um/enta\ry【 in 2016 with Nationa/l Geographic, 'Before The Flood【', where he m【et s【cientist/s, activists and \world le【ade】rs to d【i\scuss the dange【rs of climate change.Read more | How Justin Bieber 】shut down an Ic/eland\ic /beauty sp】otBack in\ 2015, DiCaprio decided to take the plung\e and purc/】hase an island in Belize \to bui\l【d his very own eco-resort, s\et to 】be \&l】dquo;\g\rou/nd-breaking in/】 the environmental movement.&rdquo】; 【The island in /qu\estion, Blackado/re Cay【e, was sold fo\r ./75 m\il/li/on to DiCaprio and his bu\siness】 partn\【er, who h\ave/ been working ever since to\ create an eco-haven in Central America, which is //s\et /t\o open in 2020.\Where exactly is it and why has/n’t it opene\d yet?\【B】lackad\/ore Caye island is sit【uated off the coa\st of Belize\, with a diverse ecosy\s】tem/ of land and /marine【 species/【 that is recognise】d g/\lo/【bally as part【 of the ‘Mesoamerican B/iological Corrido\【r&rs/qu/o;\ region. Nea\rly 1.5 million tourist 【visit Belize each y/ear, to stay in【 beachfront cottages an\d luxur】y hotel【\s alike. But Le】/onardo DiCaprio’\s e\co-reso【rt could】 mark a】 【revolutionary change to tourism i/n t/he area, as visitors would【 come \f【o/【r a &l】dquo】\;rest【orative experie】nce” o\n th/eir s】ust\ainable stay.BelizeGetty ImagesAlexander \HafemannThe eco-resort was supposed 【to o\pen in 2018, but the team anno/【unced that the opening was to be delayed u/ntil【\ late 2019 as it was still incomplete. This /year, it is pr\esumed that th\e/ new opening is to be in 2020】, as the pro/ject has been o/n 】hold while envi\r【o】/nmental /【studies and permi】ts have been】 /issued b\y th】e governm【e】nt of Belize.What would the eco-resort b\e like?The isl】and【 \has suffere\d from overf【ish\in\g, an er\o【din/g coastline and deforestation \of its m\angrove tree/】s for/ years. DiCaprio’s resor\【t is hoping to be the eco-\f/riendl/y /answer to 】the/ 104-acre island’【s environmental problems throug\h building ‘off-t【he-grid liv\ing h】omes’ /and a research\ station focused on climate chang/【e. It plans/ to be the &\l】squo;World’s】 fi\rst/ truly/ restorative is【la\nd/ develo】pment’.Related | An eco-f【riendly twist on【 Alexa C】hung's Glaston【bury styleWhen it 【finally opens, the e/xclusive eco-resort will /jo【in Belize【's Four S】e\asons H【otel, wh/ich is also/ due/ to open in th\e near future as a green destinat\i】on.M\ock /up of Four \Seaso\ns Hotel, Be/lizeCourtesy】// of Four Sea\sonsDiCaprio's e】co-resort will feature a h【otel, 】36 resort bungalow】s and 36 e】stat】】e villas, with details 【s】uch as ‘circadian/ l【ighting’ and solar panels 】so t】hat 】each ho】me i】s energy e】ff【icient. Outdoor a\nd indoor ex\periences will be m【erged with open-air buildings/ /surrounded by 】palm t【rees, lush, green landscap\es an】d infi\n【//ity po/ols.\Footbridge ove】r river i\n【 tranq/uil fore/st in BelizeGetty ImagesTim He】sterWith un/rivalled sunset views, Blackadore Caye is 【being described a】s t/he Maldi\】ves of Central A【merica.W】hat d\oes Leonardo 【DiCapri】o have to say?Di\Caprio is an avid scu】ba diver. In fact, it was【/】 his/ f【irst trip /to Beli【z\e 【\to swim【 in】 its barrier reef i】n 2005【】 \that sparked the ac\tor&\r/squo;s love\ of th\e islan\d.In an interview【 wi】th The New Y】ork Ti【mes, Leonardo DiCapr/io said/ about the eco-resort:“The \m\ain focus is to do\ \something that wi\ll cha/nge the world. I couldn&rs【quo;t have gone】 to Belize and built on an \isl】and an【/d don】e something 】like t】his, i\f it weren’t for the【【 ide/a \that it \could be groun\/】【d】-break\ing i\n the environ\me【ntal movement.”Leonardo DiCaprioReuters&【ldquo;Wi\th】 th/【e onset o【\f clima【te chan/ge, ther【e are huge challenges, \so we want the structure to \not o\nly en\hanc/e and improve the environment, but to be a m/odel fo【【r the/ future./”Sha\re this\ arti】cle \ More from places

1KsqThe world economy will suffer 】its\ wors/t year 【since】 the Great Depression of the 】1930s, The Inte/r【nati】onal \Mon】etary F\und 】has said i\n i/ts l】atest forecast.The IMF said on【 Tuesd】a【y that it e/xpec\ts the g\lobal economy to s【hrin】k 】b【y 3 percent this year. Thi】s is far w\orse than the dip of 0.1 p】er】cent in the rec/essi/on year of 】2009 after\ the \financial crash.The glo\bal economy i【s t\hen expected【 t/o rebound with a 5.8 per\c】\ent grow/th in 2021, but that outlook is【 un【certain.&l【dquo;This is an unprec/edented sh\ock. We have shutdowns of important se】ct\ors o】f th【e\ econ\omy. 】As you re/-open sectors, you start from a very lo\w base, bu\t ec【onomi\c activity【 gradually come/】s bac】k,” Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, de】puty dir【【ector of/ the IMF's research de\partment, told/ Eur/onews.The bl\eak assessment represents 【a breatht\aking downgrade by the IMF. 【In January, before the【 C\OVID-19 】outbreak /emerged as \suc【\h a grave gl\obal threat, the internat】ional lending organi/s【ation fore】cast modest growth of 3.3】 /p【【【ercent this year.Howev【er, far-re【aching measures to co【ntain the pandemic -- lockdown】s, tr\avel restriction\s】\, \busines】s shutdow】ns /and social dist\ancing -【- h【ave suddenly br】ought 】economi\c activity to a near】-standst/ill."Becau】se the economic fallout is acute in specifi/c sectors, po【licymakers will need to impl【ement substantial ta/rg【\et【ed/ fiscal, m\onetary, and f\】in【an】cial ma】rket me【as【ure【s to support affected ho【useholds and businesses domestically,"【 the IMF say】s.The IM\F say/s Europe -- the epicentre of the/ pandemic -- has been pa【rt【icularly \badly hit. Eco】nom【ic c/ontractions of\ 7.5 percent ar】e e\xpected in 【t\h【e eur\o zone's 19 countries, and 6.5 percent /in t\he United Kingdom.】&ldqu【o;\The reason for the very, very sharp downgrade c】om\pared to other 】countries is simply that the epidemi】\c h】as taken \a much larger tol/l】 so fa】r on Europe than/ it has on】 other parts of the world,&rdquo/; Milesi-Ferretti said in a\n inter\v/i【ew with\/ E\【urone【ws'】 busine\ss editor】 Sasha Vakul】ina.&ld/qu/o;T】his is why【 it is so ess】ential for governmen/ts t】o take/ really dracon】ian】 measures to keep firms from going bankrupt, to k/ee】】p workers from losing their wages\. This\ is/ also a very l【ar\g】e investment that yo【u are makin【g /int【o preparing/ t/he ec/onomy to res】】tart," h\e /said.】World trade i\s pr】ed\icted to\ plunge 【by 11 per【cent t【his【 year b【efore growing by\ 】8.4 【p/ercent in\ 2021.【The IM【F ac\compa【nies its foreca\sts\ with a warni\ng that there are many unknown factors: inc\luding t】he pa\t/h the virus will】 ta\k\e, the effectivenes/s of \policies take】n t/o cont】ain the outbr\eak an\】d l【imi【t the economic damage, and uncertainty over the situation severa/l /months fro【m now.Share\ this article【C【opy/paste the【 article video embed【 link below/:CopyShareTweetS】hares】endShareTweetShare\】se】ndMore/HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also like\ 【 \ Coron】】avir】us in E【urope: How will the EU/ €5】00bn 【rescue deal help pe【ople and bu\sinesses? / / 【 \ / Coro\navir\us va】ccine: P\【h】arma giant】s\ G/S/K/ and S/anofi team up to【 find COVID-19 solution 【 【 Sur/vivors o】f cor】onavirus on their experience/ - and【 thei/r【 new perspective 【 / / 】 More aboutCorona\vir】usIMFFin\a【\n【cial /ai/dEcono】myHot 】Top\ic/Learn more about Coronav【irus Hot \To\picLearn more about/ Coronavirus / Browse today's/ tagsuoWp

UyqiGerm【an Chancellor/ An\【ge【la Merkel said she wants \her/ country to aim】 to neutralise gas \emissions by 2050, so as to be C】O2 neutral, but this has to be r【e/alistic.Mrs M【erkel spok/e a\t the Pe】tersberg C/limate Di/al【ogue co/nference on cli【mate change /tha/t t/ook p【lace in Berlin, and noted 【that she 【understands the desire to\ pr\ot\ect the\ environment."】/There are chi\ldren a/nd you】ng people\ around the /\world who d\emonstrate ev【ery 】【week so th】at\ th/ey 】can push for】 the prot】ectio【n \of the envir【onmen【t. They are pushing \all the politicia】n】s worldwide. To be hon】est, this is \n】ot /at all pl/easant, but\ I wa\n【t t】o\ stress that i【t is】 absol【ute/ly und/erstanda\ble," the German Chan/cellor sa【id. At the same time that global leaders and internat【【ional players d/iscussed the environment, G【reenpe\ace ac\t/ivists s【taged/ a protest at \the B】randenburg Gate,/ ca【lling f】or immedia】te measu/res."We mu/st take the right deci【sions for our future now, that's why we're here. T/o s/end a /clear message for a last chance as\ ti\me is running out," said Robin Miller.Ang\ela Merkel stressed that 】we【alth\y \countries that pollute the en/vironment more have the greatest responsibility t】o face up t/o clim/【ate change immediately.\Share t/h】【/is articl【e【Copy/past】e the \article video embed\ link be】low:Co\】py\Share【TweetSharesendShareTweetShares\endMore【HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also lik】e 【 【】 】\ / 】 / Climate chan】ge: Responses to Merkel's\ vow【 to 】neutralise German'】;【s CO2 ar\e ambivalent 】 】 Carbon dioxide hits a level not】 】seen for 3 million 【y】ears. He】re&#Te】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from places【39;s what that/ \me//ans for 【\climate c】hange — and 【humanity【. \ 【 【 】 【 Eight EU countries /【call for more ambitious strateg【y t\o tackle climat/e change / / \ \ More aboutGermany/Angela M/erkelclima】te】 【chang】e】climat/e p】rotestsEnvironme】ntal prot/\ectionGreenpeaceHot TopicLearn more\ ab【out / c】limate change /Hot TopicLearn \more about \ climate change / Br【ow【se today�】s】【 t【ags4Sfh

lOOvAgriculture i【s facing a/ hi【storical challenge. In the next 3】0【 【ye【ars, food /demand will【 increa】se\ by 70 %.Facing this, it /will be necessary to i【ncrease an【d/ improv【e /production, /but al\/so】【 to lim】】it its impact on the env/ironment.Research/ers at Bio Sense institute, in Novi Sad, Serbia ar\e connecting sta【te-of-the-art technologies to crops to /cha【nge the productive model.Their mantra: "we c/annot feed\ today's world wit】h yes【ter//day 【agriculture".\And that is al/so】 the driving force behind t/he An【tares European project, which has developed a centre for ad/vanced technologies a【nd sustainable agric】ulture in this Se】rbian city located alongside the Danube.The【 Research/ Institute fo【r/ Information Technologies in】 Biosystems/ is part 】o【\f a Euro\pean funded programme to wide\n the participati/o】n of\ memb【er states and/ associated countr/i/【es who are lag【ging behind/ in /terms of res】earch and innovation.The Digit\al FarmAgriculture of the 【futu【re wil/l use 】advanced】 technologies, such as s/e【nsors, robots, drones, big data and sa】t\ellit】e/ ima/g/er/y."With a growing popul【a】tion, we need \to produce in t】【he/ next 40 years as much fo【od as we did in the pa】st 1/0000 years to\ do /that\," explai/ns Antar【es project coord】in/ator/ and electro\nics engi【ne】er, Vesna Bengin."We n【e\ed 【sensors a\nd senso】rs and some more sensors and some artific】ial intelligence on top of t【hat....to make our culture m【ore efficie\nt."Micro and nanoel】ectroni】cs de【\v/ices ena/ble farmers to c【heck th】e general s\ituation of the crops an】d sp/ot 【potential diseases at/ very early stages."Soil sensors will give 【you \the in\formation w/hen\ to irriga/t/\e and th/en not so you can diminish t\he amount of water tha\t】 is used for the ir】rigation \pro【cess," says 】Goran Kitić,/ the head of the nano-mic【ro-elec\tr】onics/ laboratory at the Biosense institute./"B】\ut/\ also we\'【re developing som\e sort of s【olutions that tell you how much of the food【 for /the plant is i/n the so\il h\ow muc【h nitrogen is in/ disarray."Several 'Digital Farm' pilot projects have alread/y been la】/\un/ched in Serbia."Digital【 agri【culture 】is t/he agric/ulture based on heavy u/s/e of d\ata\ so tha【t we are trying to 】colle/ct d】a】ta【/【 in opp【ortunis】tical【ly 【fr/om【 sensors,/ from 】the soil, fr\om plants, animals, sate/llites, drones you name it, in/ any p/ossible w】ay," e\xplain】s "d【irector of the Bi】o Se【n【se Instit【u/te,】 Vladimir Crnojević."And then 【to】 u】se the l/a/test 】closure like artificial intelligence, bi】g\【 data concept to find \s/om\e h】idden kn/o【wledge that is not】 obvious."The 】Agrosen【se platf【ormThe virtual】 【counter\part of the Digital 】Fa/rm \is the Agrosense platform.This comprehens】iv/e/ database a【llows farmers to 【plan\ the/ir\ activit【i/es and bett/er m【onit\or crop conditions, d\ue to figu/res comin】g from different sources, such as robots,\ 】optical se/nso\rs, algo\rit【hms, meteorolog】ical st/a】tions an】d satellite data.\"T【h/e system we currently use can iden\ti\fy proble/ms o/n \】a l【eaf, a fruit o【r a vegetable, so we can react \earlier\ th\an \when we might detect it. When w】e【 realiz/e【 it,【 the p【lant is already si】ck, whi】le\ \the camera and t】he\ sensors can de【tect the 【beginning of the disea】se\, " says fa\rmer/,【 Djordje Dju\kic.Satel】lit】e images coming from Copernicus\ European Earth Observatio/n Progr\amme, along with drone thermal vie/ws and smartphone's photos pr【ovide f\ur【t】her in-dep】th inf【ormation about the biol】ogical paramete【rs\ of the /crop and\ t】he f\ield.F】armers c【an al\】so exchange data, send】 pictures,】 rec//eive information o【n how much fertili/zer to use to dispense o】r how to 】optimize irrigation, via sm【ar【tphone apps.Real-time anal【ysis of the \g】【/round properties can be deli\/\vered direct【\ly【 on-/s】ite \by a/ robot /mov】ing n 】a\utonomously through the field and sam】pling the soil.This allows designers to t/a\ilor-make/ the land ma\nagement sys\tem, even on small p\articl/es of the f】ield."This will【 give you the 】results in 1【0 minutes 】an/】d 】you will instantly /know what】'/s the /si】tua/tio】n li\ke, you \w】ill hav【e// a map and\ th/is /wil】l help the 】】farmer to【 be more efficient," sa】ys Goran/ Kitić, the head of nanomicroelectron/ics lab】or】atory at th\e Bios/ense ins/titu/te.The【 resurgenc\e of woodThe c\onst\ruct\ion sector worldwide is res】ponsibl【e for one\-third of al】l the CO2 emission【s and 40% of\ all the/ 】】wastes.Bu\【t sci【entists】 \be/lieve that wood can /ha\ve great】 potential as a carbon sink and offset o/f CO2 emissions. Woo【d has been o】ne of】 the mos\t /exploit\ed b【uilding ma\te\rials throughout history. Mode/rn time】s has s【ee】\n/ 】the 】dominatio\n of ste】el and concrete\, but wood 【is【 once 】again on \the rise.In【 \】Slovenia, the InnoRene【w【 CoE project, a/ r/esearch centre \】/of excell【ence has been crea\t/ed【 to/ deve【lop new b/uilding mat】erials based o【n wo】od and recyc\l/able na\tural prod】u/ct/s."T/imber constru】ctions, /as well 【as the search for new materials \based on natural products】, are ab/out to become more common."By combining c\hemi【str【y/ and com/puter science, material science, we can cr/e】at】e mat【erial that\ can be used in the building where the /people are f/eeling the p【\ositive impacts on the【ir percept】io\n tow【ards the livi/ng\ environment," sa【ys Andreja Kutnar, InnoR【enew CoE project /coordi】nato/r and /p】rofesso/r 】of wood science and tech【nology a】t t\he University of Primors】ka, Koper."/】it's \very sustainabl】e .\..because \when w】e cut/ the【 t\ree 【at the same tim】【e w/e pla\nt another one"Wood /】m\】odification/】 process【es also al】low desired proper】ties to be produ//ced by m\eans \of \【chemical, 】\biologica\l or phy【sica【l agents. And this can co】ntribute t/o re/ducing the envi】ro\nmental footprint and /economic cost【 o】f wood 【maintenance."Wood is basically the champi】on of all the r\enewab】le ma【terial. \】It's not only it's carbon neutral it's actually carbon negative. 【So basically when /you make a wooden house not only you【 d/idn't \r/ea\lly emit any CO2 we were actually s】toring】 it /in the【 construction /itself," says Iztok &Scaro/n;u&/scaron;ter&s/caro】n;i【69; , a research group le\ader at/ the Innorenew Cen\tre of 【Excellence (CoE).Architect/s】 are【 \also lookin\g with interes】t at【 wood【【 【as a we】ll-being solution. A topic of our interest is i\ts con/nection to t【he\ well-bein\g of p】eople. "How 【【buildin/gs can reduce stress. How it can improve health," says Eva \Prelov【&scar【on\;ek Ni\/em\el】ä, a\n【 a】rchitect at Innorenew CoE.Scientific evidence h\as\ confirmed the positiv/e /imp【act of wood in w/orkin】g and li【ving spaces.Michael Burnard,\ the de\puty di\rector of the Innorenew Centre of Ex\cellen】ce say【s "people tend to find t/\he material mo/re pleasant to th】e tou/c【h and nic】er to work】 with."Researchers at the U\niversity of Primorska】 】hav/e also【 \bee【n studying\ prope/rtie】s hidden in natural sustainable ma】terials, as for example\, Cann】abis sativa.Its】【 fibre\s are unde/【rgoing】 a r\enaissance withi【n the construc\tion sec/tor, because of t【h\eir /m/echanical properties"What is in】\teresting is th】e 】m/】echanical performance of i/ts fibres, whic\h\ are almost s\】imilar to】 glass fi\bres】," expla\ins 】Laetitia M】ar】rot, /a researcher, at the I\nno【renew CoE."The he/mp plant is/ also used as an i\nsulation】 material, allowing the house to breathe. The plant will /naturally absorb /m/oisture whe】n there is too much 】or it will re/lease it when t\here is not enough in the air."Pairing the construction s【ector with su/staina\b/l【e/ forestry management cou\ld gener/ate a whole slew of a【ddition/al 【economic, social,】 and environmental b\enefits.1212121/2121212/12J】ournalist n【ame • K】】at/y\ DartfordShare this article】Copy/p\as/te the art】icle video 】embed /link below/:CopySh/areTweetSha/res【endShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareS\hare/Shar【eSendShare】S/hareYou might also like 【【 \ \ Italian/ sc/ientists believe jell【yfish will soon be a brand new \del\ic\acy in Eur/ope 【 / / 【 【 】 】 /\ Latest cutting-edge tech\nolo/gy showcased at J】apan【 trade show 【 【 】 【 \ 【 Cementing the future: the EU's【 ECO\B\/INDER pr\oject 】takes a /hard【 look at concre【te 【 / / / / Mo】re aboutEnvironme【ntal prote【ctio/nNew technologiesResearchAgri/cul\tureArchitecture 】 【 M】ost viewed 【/ 【\ 】 】 】 】 Wha/t influence on climate i//s the coronavirus loc/kdown really having? \/ \ 【 The new AI system\ safeguarding pr\ema\tur\e babies fr\om infect】ion \ / 】 【 Messeng/er/ RNA: the molecule that may teac【【\h our b/\odies to beat cancer \ Appl/e【 and Goog【le say the】y'll work together to trace spr【ead of coronav\irus via smartpho】nes / 【 \ \ 】 】/ How EU funding is】\ chang【ing the face 】【\of Lat】vi\an innovation 【 / / Browse today's tags9Jjz

Mo6P'W【asteShark the new remotely controll【【ed 】device【 that removes plastic and floa】【】ting debris from waterFIBg

2TxNTex/t sizeAaAaOn【e in four workers】 would take a pay cut to /do/ w】ork that&rsquo\;s bett】er \fo】r the envir/onment, a】ccor/din】g to new【 re【search 【by【/ careers sit【e Totaljobs. That figu/re rises t【o half among millennials, aged\ 23-38.】Al\so known as Generation Z, mi【llennials told res】earchers they’】d be wi【lling t【o /drop &pou\nd;11,0 from their 【salaries o】n average【. That compare\s to £3,800 \Genera【tion X respond】ents【 aged b】etween 39-54 said they’d be willing/ to forgo for a g/reener j】ob role.In the UK, the\ surv【ey found 60% of j【obs】eekers resear\ched a potent/ial\ employe】r’/s sustainabilit\y and 】environme】nt cr\edentia/ls before/ accepting a positio】n. M\eanwhile, \f\our in every five empl【oyees【\ though\t comp\anies had/ a re【spons【ibility to lo\o/k after /the【 environment,【 with thre【e\ in【 f】ive agreeing their employers should be /【do】ing more.Read more | Noughti\e/s\ rap legend Akon to build gre/en cityA\roun/d th/e same amou/nt were\ willing to accept cuts in sp】【ending on activitie\s like team lunche\s, furniture an【d events.Environment\ attitudes inspi/red by David Att】enb/orough an\d Greta ThunbergSome 18% of wo【rkers/ in g\en/eral an/d 34% mi/llennial【s reported\ that they \would refu/se t【o work for a company 】they thought wa\s har】ming the natural world. The majority said they w】ere m/ore interest【ed in cl\imate issues】\【 than t】\hey wer\e five years ag\o, sayi【n/g a hig/her profi【le【 in the\ /media ha\d drawn【 their attenti【on.Greta Th\unberg】 arrives \in Spain for】 COP 25Copyrigh\t 2019 \The Associated Press.】 All r/ights reservedPedr【o RochaT\he influen【ce of n/at\ural】ist a\nd broadcaster Sir【 David Attenb【orough and young ac【tiv】ist G【reta Th/unberg were 】also cited as key drive/rs for pe】opl【e to\ cut their carbon footprint.“It has ne\ver bee【n more \i/mportant f/\or busi【nesses to be 【par\t of th】e solution to 【our pl】anetary /c【rises,” said Gudrun \C/artwright, envi【ronment d\irector 】at Bus】iness i【n the Community.【&ldquo/;Young people are no 】long】er begging leaders 】to 】change but tell】ing them /that cha/nge is comi\ng re\gardles【s. Businesses that i】gno】re\ it /face an imminent\ exis\te】ntial threat. Our futures depend on \rapid,【 】ambit/ious action, and we can all make a differen【ce.”Sh【are this article More from li\feiucc

IslnPaulino Guajajara,【 a/ member \of【 an indigenous group/ i/n no/rthern\ B/ra【zil, was shot dead in an 】ambush by 】illegal loggers \o】n Frida\y a】ccording to\ /leaders of the Gu【ajajara tribe.T\hey\ said on【 S【atu/rday /that Pauli【no was\ hunting ins\ide the Arariboia res/e\rvat\ion in Ma/ranhao st\ate 】when he was attacked and s】hot in the head.An/other member of his t】ri】be, /Laercio Guajajara, w【as injured【/ \but managed to 】escape.The /clash comes 【ami\d an\ increase in \invasions of res【/ervations by 【il】leg//al loggers since Pre】sident Jair Bol/son【【ar\o t/】ook office. Elected 【this year, the president vowed t\o open up protected】 ind/igenous lands to eco\nomic development.Brazil's pan-indigenous\ organisation, APIB, said Bolson【aro's rhe】to/ri/c】 has en】】coura\ge】d violence \against indigenous \g】roups. "T/he increase/ in violence in i【】ndigenous terri/】to\ries is a】 direct result of his hateful speeches and steps tak】en against our people,"Th【e Guaja\ja】ras set 【up the Guardians of t/he Forest in 2012 to】 patrol the vast reservat\ion 】since they c/oul】dn't rely o【n po/lice to defend them/ from invasions.APIB s\】aid that Paulino's body is still lying in the forest where/】 he/ was 【shot. Police】 h【ave sent a tea】m to investigate the/ 【ci】/rcumsta】】nces of his death】\.Paulin【o spok\e to R【euters ne】ws agency earlier this year an】d s【】aid th】at protectin】g the forest from i【】ntr【uders/ was dangerous but that his pe【【opl【e could not give in t【o fe【ar【【."I'm sca【red at \tim】es】, but we have to 】lift up our heads and act.\ We\ are her】e fighting," he said."We /are protecting our land 【and the lif】e on 】/it,【 the \animal】s, \the birds, even t\he Awa who are here too," Paul】ino Guajajara said【 a/t the time. "There 】is so much destruction o【\f Nature happening, good tr】ees with wood\ as hard/【 as st】eel being cu\t down/ and taken away." "We have 【】to pres【erve 】this life f【or our children'\s future," he 】said.Share this ar/t】icl】eCopy/paste the article 【】video embed /lin\k below:Co【pySh\areTw【eetS】harese】n/dSh】ar【eTweet/Sharesend】/MoreHid】eS/ha【reSendShareShareSh】areSendShareShareYou might also like 【 Oil tanker【 owner denies causing ma【ssive】 spill off Brazi】【l's coast / / / / \ \ 【 Ama/zon chief fight\ing to 【protect rainforest p/【ut fo【rw/ard for Nobel Priz\】e / / 】 / / \ Ind/igenous Braz【ili\【ans protest ag/ainst President B】olsonaro’s land r\eforms/// / More abou/tBr】azilIndigenous peoplesEnvironme】【ntal protectionFore】stsClim【ateHot TopicL/earn more ab【【ou/t Climate Hot T/opi/cLearn more about Climate 】 Browse tod/ay【9;s tagslrux

fjJEH【ow c【ompanies across Eur【ope are c/reating sustainabl【e produ/cts\ using \no /fos】sil f】u】\elsTSdF

hA5MText sizeA【aAa/C【16 Bioscie/nces is the 【New York based/【 s\tartup producing a synthetic vers】ion of\ 】palm oil that\ doesn&\rs】quo;t rely on defore【station. The compan\y has j】ust recei】【ved a 20 millio】/n d】ollar 'series A' invest】m\ent round from Bill Gates’ Breakthrough /Energy Vent【\ure\s fund.\The \inve\stor-l/ed fun】d\ sup/ports 】cut】ting edge startups wi/t】h【 a focus on en\vironmental innovation an【d sustainabil【ity. Hence, the decision to invest in conflict-free palm /oi/l【 goes hand in \hand \with its commitment to /】/b】ack 】"companies that 【will help stop clim】a\te change." A\ 'series A' inve/s】tment is】 usually offered to a】 business/ which has alrea】dy develo【p】ed \a trac/k record /of success, as 【o/pposed to 'pre-seed' or 'seed' stages of funding which occur ear】lier in a company's lifesp【an.The synthetic pa//lm oi\l produced by C16 Biosciences /i】s /bio-based \】and \is brewed from microb/es throug】h a/ fermentation process【.Est&eacu\te】;e】 Lauder launch】es sus【tai】【na/ble scheme to tackle palm oil prod/\uctionMa【laysia/n sup\ermarket fights back to】/ ‘pr【ot】ect/ the re/putation’ of palm o\i/lForest fires /prove eco-friendly palm oil/ 'is a 【c/on'/】, says Greenpea】ce\Palm oil alternat\ive brewed like beerPalm oil exists in the【 majorit/y】 of ho【use【hold /produ】cts b\oug\ht in the】\ supermarket, \f/rom frozen piz/\zas and biscu/i\ts to sham/poo【, toothpaste a】n\d lipstick. While it is 】a versatile /vegetable \oil, deriving from/ th/e fruit o】f \oil-palm tre/es, it is one o\f the majo】r drive【rs o/f【 deforestation wo【rldwide, according to/ WWF. Destroying the world’s for\ests in order to 】obtain【\ 【it is/ not only w\r/ecking】 wildli】fe\ habitats, home to orangutans,/ elephants an】【d rh【inos, it is 】remo【vin【】g the ability of trees/ to absorb car】bon 】emi/ssions.Most cosm】\etic prod【ucts contain palm/ oilUnsplashFor \a】 concerne】d team at C16 Biosciences, there see【med like no o【\ther opti\on but to come \up with a 【【sust\ainable\【【 oil【 alternative to roll ou】t on a la】rge scale. "\We came up /with the i】dea beca【use we wit/nesse/d the mass/【ive scale【 of destruct/ion caused by palm oil deforestation first-hand," CEO Shara Ticku tells Eurone/ws Living."I was working i】n Sing】apore in 2013, which wa】s one of the worst ye】ars\ on re】cor】d for the 】fi【res in I【nd/onesia. T】he Air Quality Index (A】QI) was over 400, and over 0】 is c\onside/red】 toxic, a】nd pregnant women were restricted from goin\g outsi/de," she \continues. Shara says sh\e soon learnt that th/ese\ conseque\nces were d】irectly 】caused by \the need to】 clea【r the land\ for 】palm /o【il/ p】lantations and 【s/a\ys, "I simpl\y couldn't understand how we【 just】ified burning the planet to ma/】ke a v【egetable【 oil.】"As a/ resu【lt, C16 Biosc\】iences was born and Sh/ar\】a started /bre【win\g p/alm /oil li/k\e beer usin/g biotechnology. The company【 state,【 “fermentation is a well-pr】oven commercia【】l process tha】t has been used f\or c【enturies to convert raw mate】ri\als】 into consumable co】mmercia\l pro】ducts】 consumed by】 billions of /people【\ every d【\ay,” addin/g “our\ palm oil is sustainable.&r/dquo;I\n an offi【cial statement】, Carmichae\l R【/\o\berts of Break/through Energy Vent【ures, call】\【s the produc/t a\n【 "elegant bioman/ufacturing solut/ion /for p/alm oi【l r/eplacement" claiming that /it puts the c\ompany in a go\/od position to capi【tali【s】e on t】he “】growing need for sustainable, low-carbon bio-substitutes.”Will the alterna】tives ever re【plac【e t】he original?S/u/stainable palm【 o\il【 has \b\een criticised of late\ by The\ Ro】undtable on【 Sustaina/ble Palm】 Oil】 (RSPO) as &\ldquo;\a】 con” as there are q】uestions aroun】d how the oil can\ be grown in an environ/men/t\ally friendly way.P】alm 【oil that is grown and certified ag\ain】st the eight RSPO pri】nci】ples is based】 on stringent sustainability 】crit【eria relating to s/ocial, en/vironmental and eco/nomic good practice. But in November 2019【, Greenpeace relea\sed /its Bur】】ning Down /】the House rep\【or/t,【 finding that\ memb【ers of the /【RSPO had been at the centre of a /series of Indonesi\an forest f】】ires.\Fo【rest \of pal\m treesUnspl/ashAs a result, synthetically produ\ced palm oil might be an】 】improved s】o【l】ution. “Sus/tainabl/【e certification schemes and zero-deforestation commitments from big agri【business have fail\ed t】o【 live up】 to the/ hype,&rdqu/o; conf】irms J\oe Ei/sen, Executive Direct\o】r/ of the】 Rai【nforest /Foundation UK.&/ldquo;】Alternatives such as C16 【Biosciences c/an be part of 】the/ solution but th/ere are no】 gua\rantees】 this can be a like-for-like replacemen】t for cheap and di\rty palm oil from tropical f\orests. [] Care must 】also \【b/e paid to the possible impacts on\ mill【ions of smaller-holders for whom pal/m 】oil is a 】main sourc【e of】 livelihood,&rdquo【; he concludes.Anna Jones, He【ad// of 】Fo\rest/s at Greenpeace\ UK con【curs, sayi\ng t/hat the \charity is "not against/ u/【s【ing new tech【nol】ogies to p/r/oduce \food including palm oil" provided that the \techniqu【es 【and raw mate】ri\als used "do/ not negat/ively impact the envi\ronment or peopl【e."Share this\ art【ic】le More f/rom】 lifetgTM

aqAjText si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifeACmt

Vx6hIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsER4K

bnyUAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsg29n

dfZwA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagsmTim

jIwKNe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neysv8dr

V9zATe/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 style0Tu2

1.hJwoText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acesmW1p

2.b1Bn【Szi】get m】us\ic fe【【st】ival in Hungary/ sh】owcases its gre】en /c/\redentialsuK04

3.3MoP“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Paulino Guajajara,【 a/ member \of【 an indigenous group/ i/n no/rthern\ B/ra【zil, was shot dead in an 】ambush by 】illegal loggers \o】n Frida\y a】ccording to\ /leaders of the Gu【ajajara tribe.T\hey\ said on【 S【atu/rday /that Pauli【no was\ hunting ins\ide the Arariboia res/e\rvat\ion in Ma/ranhao st\ate 】when he was attacked and s】hot in the head.An/other member of his t】ri】be, /Laercio Guajajara, w【as injured【/ \but managed to 】escape.The /clash comes 【ami\d an\ increase in \invasions of res【/ervations by 【il】leg//al loggers since Pre】sident Jair Bol/son【【ar\o t/】ook office. Elected 【this year, the president vowed t\o open up protected】 ind/igenous lands to eco\nomic development.Brazil's pan-indigenous\ organisation, APIB, said Bolson【aro's rhe】to/ri/c】 has en】】coura\ge】d violence \against indigenous \g】roups. "T/he increase/ in violence in i【】ndigenous terri/】to\ries is a】 direct result of his hateful speeches and steps tak】en against our people,"Th【e Guaja\ja】ras set 【up the Guardians of t/he Forest in 2012 to】 patrol the vast reservat\ion 】since they c/oul】dn't rely o【n po/lice to defend them/ from invasions.APIB s\】aid that Paulino's body is still lying in the forest where/】 he/ was 【shot. Police】 h【ave sent a tea】m to investigate the/ 【ci】/rcumsta】】nces of his death】\.Paulin【o spok\e to R【euters ne】ws agency earlier this year an】d s【】aid th】at protectin】g the forest from i【】ntr【uders/ was dangerous but that his pe【【opl【e could not give in t【o fe【ar【【."I'm sca【red at \tim】es】, but we have to 】lift up our heads and act.\ We\ are her】e fighting," he said."We /are protecting our land 【and the lif】e on 】/it,【 the \animal】s, \the birds, even t\he Awa who are here too," Paul】ino Guajajara said【 a/t the time. "There 】is so much destruction o【\f Nature happening, good tr】ees with wood\ as hard/【 as st】eel being cu\t down/ and taken away." "We have 【】to pres【erve 】this life f【or our children'\s future," he 】said.Share this ar/t】icl】eCopy/paste the article 【】video embed /lin\k below:Co【pySh\areTw【eetS】harese】n/dSh】ar【eTweet/Sharesend】/MoreHid】eS/ha【reSendShareShareSh】areSendShareShareYou might also like 【 Oil tanker【 owner denies causing ma【ssive】 spill off Brazi】【l's coast / / / / \ \ 【 Ama/zon chief fight\ing to 【protect rainforest p/【ut fo【rw/ard for Nobel Priz\】e / / 】 / / \ Ind/igenous Braz【ili\【ans protest ag/ainst President B】olsonaro’s land r\eforms/// / More abou/tBr】azilIndigenous peoplesEnvironme】【ntal protectionFore】stsClim【ateHot TopicL/earn more ab【【ou/t Climate Hot T/opi/cLearn more about Climate 】 Browse tod/ay【9;s tags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsurhq

4.R6RsTe】xt 】si/zeAa/AaThe Danis【h retail\ entrepreneu【r/ and philanthro/pis【t Anders Holc【h Povlsen is already Scotland’s larges【t\ private \land owner. Now he /is/ submitt/ing plans to\ bui/l/d a new】 tourist hub in 】a rem】\ote Highl【and town, amid protest from locals who claim sm】all\ busi\nesses will be driven【 out./The proposed /tourist attraction would be erected in the s\mall village of T【ongue, loca/ted halfw/ay up\ 【the/ sce】nic 【No【r】th Coas】t\ 500 touring route. Tong【ue 【already\ comprise】s of a yo\u\【t\h host\el, craft shop, gen/eral\ \store and \gara/ge, a bank, a 【post off】ice【【 and two hotels.For Povlsen, who【se\】 n/et worth is in the regi/on of €8 billi\on, the goal 】is to/ creat【e a community 【【space in what is des【c\ribed as a “lo/st” a】rea 】of the Highlands【.Anders】 Holch PovlsenAPBo AmstrupThe live planning application/ is being put【 foward 】by Wildland Lim\ited, P】ovlsen】’s self-】m\ade conservation project, wh/ich aims to ad【vance the “sustainable/ 【development of some of Scotland’s most ru\gged, precious and/ 】beautiful landscapes.”What will the】 new village\ be like】?If approv】ed, the vi\llage to\ be【\ called ‘Bur//r’s Stores&rsq】uo;, will consist\】 of 【a /range of amenities inc【luding a】 rest】aurant,】 bakeh】ouse, a shop sellin\g local and se\asonal prod\uce, an even】ts space,【 accommodation】 for staff an\d visitors, new fuel pumps and】 a microbrewery.Acc\ordi/ng to T/\he Heral【d Sc【o】】t\la\/n\d, 】su】ch plans would 】&l【dquo;transform【” /the village and &】ldquo;restore the area to its f\or/mer glory \[]\ whi/le maintaining【 its h\istor\ic c【harac】ter/.&rdquo】; U/nder】 design【\ princ】iples in the/ plann】【ing ap\pl】/ication\, Wi\ldland Limited also claim that the village will “be s【ustainable 】\and respect the n【atural beau/ty” of the area and\ prior/itise /pedestrians.Vision of the/ villageWil】\dland Limite\dEve】nts space for c/\ultural/live music eventsWild】l【\and LimitedBurr'【s Stores 【pr】】opose\d imagesWi\ldland LimitedWill the\ plan/s negatively affect local bus【iness/es?So far, Tongue, Melness and Skerray Co【mmunity 】Council, Kyl/e 】/of Tongue /Hostel and the Ben Loya【l Hotel have a【ll object\ed the plans. “This is n】ot\ fair comp】et【iti】on for other accommodatio\n providers i】n the area 【and will d/irectl\y d/isplace\ business from 】us and other providers,&\rd/quo; 】Suza】\n\ne Mackay,】 【owne/r of\ the Kyle /of\ Tongue Hostel】 and H\olid/ay P\ark, to【ld the Daily M/ail.&ldquo/;Tr】ying to\ compete with a company that has no nee\d to m\ake /a profit is uns/u\s【tain\able,” ag】rees /Sarah Fo】/x from the 】B/en Loyal Hotel.Wil【dland L【imited 】tells Eurone\ws Living that this wil【l in no way be a \tou【rist &lsq】uo;resort’ and is rather a “collection of sensitive【ly re\s\【tored buildin】gs,/ which may house c【afes, small retail\ers and c\o【mmunity spaces.”Highlands, Sc\otlandU【nsplashIn r/esponse to complaints, a spokesperson fro】m】 the/ company co【mmen【ted “we are 【act/ively lis\tening to the views of【 \the com\muni/ty.” They adde】d, “the revitalisati\on of this part of the village w【ill, of course, be a highly colla/\borative effort, with a strong focus】 on complementing Tongue&rsq】/uo;s already】 estimabl\e visitor attr】a】ctions.&rdqu】o\; Ultimately【, &】ldquo;l\eaving this\ site/ to become dereli\ct/ is\ not a【n option,”】 they concl\uded/.The planning document\ states that facil】ities /for both tourists and locals will &/【ldquo;n\ot negative【ly 【】impact 【upon ne/ighbourin】g b】u】【sinesses.”【When asked about h【is conservation p/ro\jec/ts by property cons\ultanc】y Knight Frank, Povlse【n co【mmented, /&ldquo/;you/ might call it philanthropy, 】I\ prefer to think of /it as investing in the natural】 world.”Sha【re this\/ articl\e 【 More from/ pla】ces0mK8

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aXK9Scienti【st】s es【ti【mate that roughly 】on/e million la\n/d and\ marin【e species may】 bec【ome extinct in the foreseeab/le f\uture. Many within】 decades. What are the main【 reasons for th/e decl\ine\ of under/water ec\osystems?Thanos Dailianis, a marine\ biologist fr】om the\// HCM【R-IMBB\C /resea【rc【h instit/ute /【in【 Crete,/ exp\la/\i】ns.“Marine ecosyste】ms are threatened bo/th locally 】\an【d globally/. At the lo\cal l】【evel, the/ coastal zo】ne hosts】 a lot of 【human activities, 】/ i\mp】】o\rt\ant human activities, like 】urban【isation, like agricu\lture, industry of】 co/urse, and【 ot\her uses which cause loc【a\lise/d fo】rms of degradation, l【ike pollutio/n,/ l】et’s s\ay.""But on the other hand, we have la\rge-sca\【le ph】enomena, like global warming/, or ocea/n a\cidificat/ion, which【【 \of course jo】in toge/the】r with the local】 pre\ssures and【 cause/ sometimes uncontrolled ef【/fects【.""In Crete, 】we’/re located in t/he Eastern/ Mediterranean which】/ ri\ght now【 i/s the warmest place in the Mediterranean/ basin.\ This【, a/】lon/【gsid\e with】 the adjacency with /the S\u【ez Cana【l, makes \it】 very sus\ce】pti【ble to ch【an/g【e right now.""So what we see here is an// early w】arning o/f 】things that will probably spread/ 】towards【 the 】west】 of the Mediterranean /in the\ fo\】rthcoming\ years.""/And【 of cour\se, these t【hings also happen at the global level. Global w/armin/g is a global t/hr【eat, of course, and species coming fr【/om other parts /of \th/e world is【 a universal trend right now becaus【e of this ong/oing c/hang/e.""We are of c【ourse c/oncerned because we feel it is our duty to preserve t/his biodiversity for future generations, an/d we feel t【hat righ【/t now it/’s on the ve\rge of be】coming de\g\r\ade\d.""Nature finds its ways, and t【/his 】ri/ch/ness will/ be replaced by \another richness. /The】 problem is\ mainly for us because we ha】v【e built our 【lives \with this biodive/rsity, so the loss of t/his biodiversity 【will /ma/inly af/【】f\ect hum【【ans as a species.""T】he \service\s it provides to us,/ the food, the 】\environment; all the】 stuff that makes】 our【 life nice \t【o live.\&/rdquo;Share this art】icle\【Copy】/paste the article video\ embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShare】SendS】hareShareShareSendShareS】hareYo【u /might a\lso like 】 】 】 What’s k/illing】 our \unde【rw/ater ecosystems? 】 【 】 】 / 】 】 Uncharted wate】rs: how maps ca/n help prevent conf\lict o【v/er /marine resources 】 / 【 \ 【 【 \ \ Famil】y-run fisheries struggle as n/ew generation casts net wider 】 【 More a】boutOceanFauna and Flor【aEn\vironment/【al prot【\ectionbiodiversityGree【ce 】 Mo】st viewed \ \Wh】at influ/ence on climate i\s the corona\virus lockdown rea\lly【 having? \ 【 【 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from infec】tion 【 Me/ssenger RNA: th【e mol【ecul/e that \may teach \our bodies to b【e/at cancer 【 \ 【 Apple and Go\ogle 【say they'll work toge/th【er to trace spr\e\ad of coronavirus\ \via smart\p\hones / How EU】 funding is changi\ng 【【the face of La\tvian innova】ti\on \ 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsXdRJ

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uwKTOcean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tagszJHo

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FIZVTe】xt 】si/zeAa/AaThe Danis【h retail\ entrepreneu【r/ and philanthro/pis【t Anders Holc【h Povlsen is already Scotland’s larges【t\ private \land owner. Now he /is/ submitt/ing plans to\ bui/l/d a new】 tourist hub in 】a rem】\ote Highl【and town, amid protest from locals who claim sm】all\ busi\nesses will be driven【 out./The proposed /tourist attraction would be erected in the s\mall village of T【ongue, loca/ted halfw/ay up\ 【the/ sce】nic 【No【r】th Coas】t\ 500 touring route. Tong【ue 【already\ comprise】s of a yo\u\【t\h host\el, craft shop, gen/eral\ \store and \gara/ge, a bank, a 【post off】ice【【 and two hotels.For Povlsen, who【se\】 n/et worth is in the regi/on of €8 billi\on, the goal 】is to/ creat【e a community 【【space in what is des【c\ribed as a “lo/st” a】rea 】of the Highlands【.Anders】 Holch PovlsenAPBo AmstrupThe live planning application/ is being put【 foward 】by Wildland Lim\ited, P】ovlsen】’s self-】m\ade conservation project, wh/ich aims to ad【vance the “sustainable/ 【development of some of Scotland’s most ru\gged, precious and/ 】beautiful landscapes.”What will the】 new village\ be like】?If approv】ed, the vi\llage to\ be【\ called ‘Bur//r’s Stores&rsq】uo;, will consist\】 of 【a /range of amenities inc【luding a】 rest】aurant,】 bakeh】ouse, a shop sellin\g local and se\asonal prod\uce, an even】ts space,【 accommodation】 for staff an\d visitors, new fuel pumps and】 a microbrewery.Acc\ordi/ng to T/\he Heral【d Sc【o】】t\la\/n\d, 】su】ch plans would 】&l【dquo;transform【” /the village and &】ldquo;restore the area to its f\or/mer glory \[]\ whi/le maintaining【 its h\istor\ic c【harac】ter/.&rdquo】; U/nder】 design【\ princ】iples in the/ plann】【ing ap\pl】/ication\, Wi\ldland Limited also claim that the village will “be s【ustainable 】\and respect the n【atural beau/ty” of the area and\ prior/itise /pedestrians.Vision of the/ villageWil】\dland Limite\dEve】nts space for c/\ultural/live music eventsWild】l【\and LimitedBurr'【s Stores 【pr】】opose\d imagesWi\ldland LimitedWill the\ plan/s negatively affect local bus【iness/es?So far, Tongue, Melness and Skerray Co【mmunity 】Council, Kyl/e 】/of Tongue /Hostel and the Ben Loya【l Hotel have a【ll object\ed the plans. “This is n】ot\ fair comp】et【iti】on for other accommodatio\n providers i】n the area 【and will d/irectl\y d/isplace\ business from 】us and other providers,&\rd/quo; 】Suza】\n\ne Mackay,】 【owne/r of\ the Kyle /of\ Tongue Hostel】 and H\olid/ay P\ark, to【ld the Daily M/ail.&ldquo/;Tr】ying to\ compete with a company that has no nee\d to m\ake /a profit is uns/u\s【tain\able,” ag】rees /Sarah Fo】/x from the 】B/en Loyal Hotel.Wil【dland L【imited 】tells Eurone\ws Living that this wil【l in no way be a \tou【rist &lsq】uo;resort’ and is rather a “collection of sensitive【ly re\s\【tored buildin】gs,/ which may house c【afes, small retail\ers and c\o【mmunity spaces.”Highlands, Sc\otlandU【nsplashIn r/esponse to complaints, a spokesperson fro】m】 the/ company co【mmen【ted “we are 【act/ively lis\tening to the views of【 \the com\muni/ty.” They adde】d, “the revitalisati\on of this part of the village w【ill, of course, be a highly colla/\borative effort, with a strong focus】 on complementing Tongue&rsq】/uo;s already】 estimabl\e visitor attr】a】ctions.&rdqu】o\; Ultimately【, &】ldquo;l\eaving this\ site/ to become dereli\ct/ is\ not a【n option,”】 they concl\uded/.The planning document\ states that facil】ities /for both tourists and locals will &/【ldquo;n\ot negative【ly 【】impact 【upon ne/ighbourin】g b】u】【sinesses.”【When asked about h【is conservation p/ro\jec/ts by property cons\ultanc】y Knight Frank, Povlse【n co【mmented, /&ldquo/;you/ might call it philanthropy, 】I\ prefer to think of /it as investing in the natural】 world.”Sha【re this\/ articl\e 【 More from/ pla】cesBSj8

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